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Tuia - Encounters 250 commemorations seeking volunteers for October

24 September 2019

There is still time to get involved behind the scenes of the Tuia 250 – Encounters commemoration in October marking the 250th anniversary of Captain Cook’s visit to Aotearoa/New Zealand.

There is still time to get involved behind the scenes of the Tuia 250 – Encounters commemoration in October marking the 250th anniversary of Captain Cook’s visit to Aotearoa/New Zealand.

The Tuia 250 commemoration is a national programme of events and education being expressed through music, storytelling, kapa haka, arts, and other cultural activities, around the country, as well as on the Coromandel.

In our district, Tuia – 250 Encounters commemorates and recognises the connections made by Māori communities from Ngāti Hei and Ngāti Whanaunga with Captain Cook and his crew upon their arrival in Mercury Bay in 1769.

The Mercury 250 Anniversary Trust has been formed to bring together individuals, community groups, event organisers and businesses willing to have input into Tuia commemorations.

The Ngāti Hei Trust and the Mercury 250 Anniversary Trust are seeking friendly and enthusiastic people of all ages to volunteer at the upcoming events being held during October as part of the Tuia - Encounters 250 commemoration.

A wide variety of roles and responsibilities need to be filled and you are invited to bring your skills and experience to the forefront to add success to these events. If you are interested in becoming a volunteer email volunteers@mercury250.org or phone Kerryn on 021 0256 0645.

In our district, Tuia – 250 Encounters commemorates and recognises the connections made by Māori communities from Ngāti Hei and Ngāti Whanaunga to Captain Cook and his crew’s arrival.

One of the central events is the Tuia 250 Voyage – a journey of national significance showcasing the Pacific, Māori and European voyaging that brought us together. A flotilla of waka hourua, va’a tipaerua and tall will sail the coast from October to December 2019, landing at community events where you can visit the vessels. Click here to to follow the journey of the flotilla.

Te Whanganui o Hei/ Mercury Bay is one of the four landing sites in Aotearoa/New Zealand where Europeans and Māori first met 250 years ago in October 1769.

Te pōwhiri at Wharekaho, (Simpsons Beach), will capture much attention on Friday 18 October. A Ngāti Hei representative will provide narration explaining the proceedings of the Pōwhiri along with historical information. At 11:30am the manuhiri (voyagers, community members, dignitaries, visitors to the area), will gather at the north end and begin the1.2km hīkoi. Members of the general public are welcome to join the hīkoi, however, participation in the Pōwhiri is restricted to guests who have registered prior to this sold out event. In the afternoon, hāngī will be served followed by entertainment including kapa haka performances.

On Saturday 19 October The Tuia Stage located at Taylor’s Mistake (Whakau Reserve) is an epic 12 hour free cultural showcase featuring the very best that the Coromandel has to offer in local talent - musicians, poets, composers and performers. Artists have been invited to choose existing compositions of music, poetry or stories - or to create new ones - which reflect their expressions (their lived experiences) of the kaupapa of Tuia – Encounters 250.

The Coromandel Master Weavers Collective will also feature their contemporary installation - Star Waka - and demonstrate their talents next to The Tuia stage, and an art exhibition of both local artists’ works and a touring exhibition is being installed in ArtStation - the Old Fire Brigade Building.  This family-friendly cultural extravaganza on 19 and 20 October in Whakau Reserve is all free thanks to grants from Lottery Tuia 250 Programme and, in the case of the ArtStation exhibition, a generous benefactor.

For more information visit the Mercury 250 website www.mercury250.org.

Cooks Beach cairn reinstated before Tuia 250 commemorations

(The stone cairn reinstated at Cooks Beach)

The stone cairn commemorating Captain Cook’s voyage is now back on site at Cooks Beach.

The cairn, which marked the 1769 visit of Captain Cook to New Zealand, toppled into the sea during a storm in July 2018. 

The new site where the cairn sits includes a new path and a board walk, heritage signage as well as a platform with a view to a buoy that marks where Cook's ship The Endeavour was moored 250 years ago. The Mercury 250 Anniversary Trust is also putting a sextant on top of the cairn, this is an instrument which was used for navigating during Cook’s times, as it has a graduated arc of 60° and a sighting mechanism, used for measuring the angular distances between objects.

The surrounding area has been planted with coastal natives and interpretative and directional signage is schedule to be installed next week.

For more information visit our website.