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Council swift to adopt Shoreline Management pathways

15 September 2022

The Shoreline Management pathways flew through Council adoption this week, with a round of applause at the conclusion of the three-year long, ground-breaking piece of work.

auanui Dune Planting

Above: Pauanui Dune Planting Project, May 2022 

Council swift to adopt Shoreline Management pathways

The Shoreline Management pathways flew through Council adoption this week, with a round of applause at the conclusion of the three-year long, ground-breaking piece of work.  

The pathways are the key outcome of the Shoreline Management project which has worked to define the flooding and erosion risks to our people and assets over the next century and beyond. 
Each pathway is specific to a section of our coastline and sets out how our communities want to manage the risks from sea level rise.

A co-governance structure with the Pare Hauraki Collective has been critical to the project’s development and execution, along with community leadership through four Coastal Panels.

“Empowering local people to make recommendations on the future management of coastlines has been hugely valuable,” says Project Lead, Amon Martin.

“Agencies including Waka Kotahi (New Zealand Transport Agency) and Waikato Regional Council have given key input, alongside consultants Royal Haskoning, who have been part of this project since its inception three years ago.  Everyone working together has been the defining feature of our project,” says Amon.

He says the collaboration of all parties will be even more critical as our Council moves to action the preferred pathways.  

The next step now is for our Council’s Executive Leadership Team to consider an Implementation Plan with the allocated budget for this financial year, as well as looking at sourcing external funding options for additional work that is identified.

Implementation work currently planned includes doing more detailed costing of coastal protection options in vulnerable areas.

For example, in Moanataiari, a suburb of Thames, where the recommended pathway is for managed retreat over the long-term, the next step is for environment and engineering company Tonkin and Taylor to assess the current sea wall protection. The work will consider if strengthening and improving the protection could extend the timeframes before managed retreat is required.

There will also be further iwi engagement to help determine implementation priorities as well as target further engagement that is specific to some areas and issues.

“Overall, we’ll be ensuring that infrastructure planning in our district takes account of the hazards we’ve assessed through the Shoreline Management project, so we are adequately planning for the risks to our people, assets and environment,” says Amon.

The project team will continue working with Waikato Regional Council to understand the river hazards in our communities in more detail.

Information about the adaptation pathways from the project will also be made available in a digital tool. 

For more information visit tcdc.govt.nz/smp.