Latest News & Public Notices

Tsunami information open days for the Firth of Thames

10 June 2019

Tsunami information open days will be held for the west coast of the Coromandel to give our local communities an opportunity to learn about tsunami and the potential threat to the Firth of Thames. The aim of these open days is to create further awareness and also a chance for more community input.

Mercury Bay tsunami information open dayDrop-in to one of the following locations to talk directly with the tsunami experts and emergency managers who have worked on this and other community response plan projects:

 

Photo: Mercury Bay tsunami information open day

  • 19 June - Thames Bowling Club, 512 Mackay Street, from 12pm - 2pm
  • 19 June - Te Puru Hall, 4 West Crescent from 5pm - 7pm
  • 20 June - Coromandel Council Board meeting room, 355 Kapanga Road from 12pm - 2pm
  • 20 June - Colville Community Hall, Colville Road from 5pm - 7pm.

Recently our Council’s Emergency Management Unit Officer, Pamela Balt, has been working with communities around our district to establish community response groups.

"We've heard that alerting and evacuation are among the two biggest concerns locals have in a tsunami and so these open days we're holding provide an opportunity for the public to have the science explained so that they can be better prepared to respond," says Ms Balt. "Community response plans are developed so there's better measures in place to help communities look after themselves. When a natural disaster hits, people may need to take care of themselves for up to three days before help can arrive."

The information will be available online prior to the open days if you’re not able to attend. Please visit Waikato Regional Council’s website here to read about the tsunami modelling and assessments, and to look at the maps for your area. 

You can also view our community guides to emergencies for other areas here.

What do we know about tsunami modelling?

Seven Sharp carried out a live tsunami drill to show you what to do if you're caught on the Kiwi coastline after a big quake. 

Above: Seven Sharp carried out a live tsunami drill to show you what to do if you're caught on the Kiwi coastline after a big quake. Click here to watch.

Tsunami modelling work is being done to better understand the potential impacts of a tsunami.

The first study looking at modelling of the impact a tsunami generated from the Kerepehi fault on the Firth of Thames has just been completed.

"Tsunami modelling work has been completed to better understand the potential impacts of a tsunami generated from the Kerepehi fault on the Firth of Thames," says Rick Liefting, Waikato Regional Council's Regional Hazards and Environmental Compliance team leader. "The modelling work builds on previous studies and uses the latest mapping tools and tsunami computer models to determine where sea inundation is likely to occur from various sources of tsunami."

All of New Zealand is at risk of earthquakes and all of our coastline is at risk of tsunami. We can’t predict when one will happen, but we can protect ourselves and our family. Not sure what to do in a tsunami? Click here to find out more.

Remember: Long or strong, get gone

Remember: Long or strong, get gone

If you feel an earthquake that makes it hard to stand, or lasts more than a minute – move immediately to higher ground or as far inland as possible.

Get ready to ShakeOut again

Shake OutNew Zealand ShakeOut, our national earthquake drill and tsunami hikoi, is taking place on Thursday 17 October at 1.30pm. You can sign up again today.

The Ministry of Civil Defence & Emergency Management is encouraging all schools, businesses and households to sign up, hold a Drop, Cover and Hold drill, and plan a tsunami hīkoi if you are in a tsunami zone.

All of New Zealand is at risk of earthquakes and all of our coastline is at risk of tsunami. We can’t predict when they will happen, but we can protect ourselves and those we care about. Last year over 800,000 people took part in the annual event.

This year, the time of the drill has moved to 1.30pm so you can plan an afternoon of emergency preparedness, including a tsunami hīkoi if you're near the coast. Once you've signed up, they'll keep you posted with tips and hints for planning your drill and follow up activities.

A new website is being launched in July, which will be a one-stop shop for emergency preparedness, and will include a new ShakeOut space. In the meantime, you can sign up for ShakeOut now at www.shakeout.govt.nz (a temporary page on the Ministry’s website) and share the date with your school.

Once you’ve signed up to ShakeOut, the organisers will keep you updated and send you information to help you plan your drill.